Elections

Will you always vote along party lines, or are you prepared to vote your conscience on a matter in which you disagree with your party's position?

Responses to the question: "Will you always vote along party lines, or are you prepared to vote your conscience on a matter in which you disagree with your party's position?"

← Back to Election Page

In This Page:

16 Candidate Responses (top)

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale
CandidateBrief ResponseFull Response
Anthony Giles No This is what the Libertarian Party is all about. We are all about freedom. Each member is free to vote as they please.
Dave Braden No I will always vote my conscience.
Jamile Ghaddar No We believe that people should vote based on the decision of their local constituents after a process of collective discussion to establish the line forward. Our program for democratic renewal aims to end the domination of the electoral system by the political parties.
Nancy MacBain Yes The NDP is the only party I have ever supported. I am comfortable carrying the NDP banner in this election because my personal beliefs and values mirror those of the NDP.

At the same time, I am a person of integrity and conviction. I would not blindly follow a NDP policy out of loyalty to the party. I also believe that an MP's first responsibility is to his or her constituents.
Peter Ormond No The Greens are not like any of the other three major parties in Canada in that our candidate voices are not censured by the old boys club, and we aren't given censured soundbites to feed to the media. Therefore, no, I would not feel bound to vote along party lines. However, if you review Vision Green, our policy platform available on our website, you'll wonder why Canada, one of the world's wealthiest countries, is not taking steps today by investing in sustainable infrastructure and communities that foster healthy local communities and improve the lives of citizens within in. It will be a great day when elected Green politicians are in a position to vote along party lines.
Hamilton Centre
CandidateBrief ResponseFull Response
Lisa Nussey No We believe that people should vote based on the decision of their local constituents after a process of collective discussion to establish the line forward. Our program for democratic renewal aims to end the domination of the electoral system by the political parties.
Michael James Baldasaro No No. It is the people of the Riding I will serve. Ultimately, I firmly believe that in order to have a true Democracy everyone would have to vote Independent. Abolish political parties. The mice have to learn to vote for mice and stop voting for the big fat Black Cats (the Conservatives), big fat White Cats (the Liberals) and the big fat Spotted Cats (the NDP). Refer: "Mouseland" by Tommy Douglas http://www.iamm.com/mouseland.htm
Hamilton East-Stoney Creek
CandidateBrief ResponseFull Response
Bob Green Innes No Our party is a young party which recognizes both regional and economic disparities which the present whip system cannot. The above parliamentary reforms give voice, not only to dissenting party members, but to all House members in drafting legislation. Thus, I intend to vote in the best interest of both Hamilton and Canada.
David Hart Dyke No The Green Party does not favour whipped votes, except on matters relating to our core values. It's very unlikely that anybody would be a Green Party member without believing in those, so I can honestly say that my conscience comes first, but that's easy for a Green Party candidate. I can't think of a situation where I'd have to oppose the party on an issue that would force me into the situation you describe. There are certainly issues where I disagree with the Green Party and would vote my conscience, but I wouldn't have to leave the party to do so.
Gord Hill No If I felt the matter to be of Great importance to me I would vote my own way. On subjects that I was indifferent to I would go with the Party.
Greg Pattinson No I joined the Libertarian party because the party's views are almost identical to my own. That is the only reason I joined the party instead of running as an independent. As a member of a small party I have a bigger influence on the party's policies than a Conservative or Liberal candidate would, making them even closer to my own. That being said, I feel that the idea of a whipped vote is ludicrous. Politicians should always vote their conscience. The parliamentary practice of having an official party whip is something that needs reform. It adds unnecessary cost to the taxpayer in paying for the appointment and also is an infringement of freedom of expression.
Wayne Marston No While my values are very much in accord with the animating principles of the NDP, I will definitely vote my conscience when circumstances require it. For example, I voted against my caucus on Bill C-429, (M. Asselin, Bloc) use of wood. This bill seemed to me to unfairly single out wood for preferential treatment, when I believe the government should be pushing hard to promote and protect Canadian steel.
Wendell Fields No We believe that people should vote based on the decision of their local constituents after a process of collective discussion to establish the line forward. Our program for democratic renewal aims to end the domination of the electoral system by the political parties.
Hamilton Mountain
CandidateBrief ResponseFull Response
Marie Bountrogianni Maybe Politics is often about negotiation and compromise between different points of view. No legislation is ever "perfect". Therefore, on some matters, I would be willing to put aside some personal concerns in order to vote for key legislation -- or for legislation that isn't perfect, but is still necessary, or good.

If a matter arose in which I objected to my party's direction, I would do everything I could to change the party policy. I would dialogue with my colleagues, with party members, and with members of the public -- in order to share my own concerns, and to hear and consider other perspectives. If, in the end, I was unable to change party's position, and yet I still had a profound, conscientious objection, I would be willing to vote with my conscience.
Stephen E. Brotherston No When push comes to shove, I would have to vote my conscience.
Niagara West-Glanbrook
CandidateBrief ResponseFull Response
Stephen Bieda No Fortunately my soci-economic, political and cultural values align well with the Liberal Party platform so it would be rare where my conscience or personal preference would differ. However, I would be prepared to deviate from the flock and represent my constituents' interests when necessary.

Response Summary (top)

Brief ResponseCount% of Total
Yes16.3%
No1487.5%
Maybe16.3%

15 Candidates Have Not Responded (top)

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale
David Sweet
Hamilton Centre
Annie Tennier
David Christopherson
James W. Byron
Hamilton East-Stoney Creek
Bob Mann
Brad Clark
Michelle Stockwell
Hamilton Mountain
Chris Charlton
Henryk Adamiec
Jim Enos
Terry Anderson
Niagara West-Glanbrook
Bryan Jongbloed
David Heatley
Dean Allison
Sid Frere