Elections

Mark Wozny, Candidate for Mayor in Hamilton Municipal Election 2018

Details page for this candidate.

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Candidate Details (top)

NameWozny, Mark
ElectionHamilton Municipal Election 2018
AreaMayor
PartyN/A
Votes0
Email mwozny@bell.net
Website (no website listed)
Home905-664-1333
Business
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Responses to Questions (top)

QuestionBrief ResponseFull Response
Since the 1950s, most new residential and commercial development in Hamilton has been single-use suburban sprawl. Do you believe Hamilton needs to concentrate new development within the already-built area? Why or why not? Yes Construction of new development within the already-built area is something that I have focused on for a great many years.Suburban/Urban sprawl is prohibitively expensive, and in the past has proven to be a major subsidy for devvelopers. There is no sound reason why the average rate-payer should be compelled to shoulder the huge costs of urban sprawl.

I fought to preserve the Red Hill Valley for many years. While still in the planning stage, the project could not justify iteself given that there was some 42 years + of development lands north of Rymal Road. Unfortunately, the speculators, developers, money laundering people (and more, according to the RCMP) seem to have their way with City Council as the rule, rather than the exception.
Should Hamilton be trying to attract more young people to live, work and start businesses here, including the 60,000 students studying at Mohawk College, McMaster University and Redeemer University? If so, what should we be doing? If not, why not? Yes In order to attract more young people to the City, we should ensure more affordable housing such as geared-to- income develpoment, revisions to our Bank of Canada to re-instate its mandate to pre 1974 and help in creating /contributing to co-operative housing/co-operative work/design/office space by engaging community based bond raising, akin to Tapestry and other similar organizations.
Hamilton has been experiencing a slow-motion crisis in housing affordability. Do you support an expanded role for the City to provide more affordable housing? If so, what should Hamilton do? If not, why not? Yes In order to attract more young people to the City, we should ensure more affordable housing such as geared-to- income develpoment, revisions to our Bank of Canada to re-instate its mandate to pre 1974 and help in creating /contributing to co-operative housing/co-operative work/design/office space by engaging community based bond raising, akin to Tapestry and other similar organizations.
The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act mandates that cities must be completely accessible by 2025. What changes would you make to ensure Hamilton complies with this mandate? Maybe Accessibility is a necessity with the exception of HIstorical / Special Interest Structures.

Toronto witnessed the destruction of of some fine buildings, particularly entertainment venues when space / finances made such changes unfeasible. While in the very small minority, these buildings were monuments to creativity and aesthetics. Before taking a position, suggest we do a full survey and an adding up. Let's 'measure twice and cut once'
Global warming is an existential challenge facing humanity. Do you think Hamilton should play a role in addressing climate change? If so, what should the city be doing? If not, why not? Yes Climate change seems to be one of the hot buttons at all level of government.

While City Council on its own, might not be able to effect changes in construction and by-laws that would redirect housing and fossil fuel consumption, the committee of Large City Mayors could certainly lobby to Provincial and Federal governments to ensure that new units become 'solar powered'

Solar power costs have gone from some $200 per kwh to some $55 per kwh (in U.S. dollars) Given the plumetting costs and the ability to power not only the home, but vehicles as well, this is something that should be part of the government mandate - perhaps not only on the City level, but through the CMHC - mortgages/loans as the majority are guarranteed by the Canadian Citizens.

Hamilton should maintain its forest canopy and ensure all 'treed properties' are preserved, at least as long as possible, in the face of new development.

All new housing should be equiped with rainwater reservoirs. Especially in a pinch, the water can be used to maintain yard health, particularly the trees which might consume some 5 gallons of water when in a mature stage.
Do you support the "Vision Zero" goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries in Hamilton? If so, what specific actions would you take to implement this policy? If not, why not? Yes Some take the position that traffic fatalaties are reduced by one-way streets and proper signal regulation. I take the middle position.

As long as there is a mixture of both one-way and two-way streets, the option tends to 'tame' traffic congestion and stress.

Two-way strees assist in reducing the pace of both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. Jacobs has noted how some congestion creates more vitality for businesses and encourages the social intercourse that we call community.
Hamilton has a legacy of multi-lane, one-way arterial streets dating back to the 1950s. Do you support accelerating the conversion of these streets to two-way? Why or why not? Yes Some take the position that traffic fatalaties are reduced by one-way streets and proper signal regulation. I take the middle position.

As long as there is a mixture of both one-way and two-way streets, the option tends to 'tame' traffic congestion and stress.

Two-way strees assist in reducing the pace of both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. Jacobs has noted how some congestion creates more vitality for businesses and encourages the social intercourse that we call community.
Do you support improved public transit in Hamilton? If so, what changes do you propose? If not, why not? Yes Improved Public Transit in Hamilton will come about when there is an enhanced, workable demand for it.

Just as Festivals (park/street) draw people together from the entire spectrum of the community, transit must learn to draw from all ages and income brackets.

I propose that once monthly, public transit should be made free of charge-perhaps pay what you like or that each household be given several passes to cover single trips over the course of the year.

Give people a an incentive to 'try it before they buy it'
Council has voted dozens of times since 2008 to advance Hamilton's light rail transit (LRT) project, including voting to submit the plan with a full funding request to the Province in 2013, and voting to accept full funding and implementation from the Province in 2015. Do you support completing the LRT plan? Why or why not? No The LRT would be to the detriment of too many people. Unwanted congestion would take place due to our narrow streets, family businesses would be markedly interrupted and the exercise too anachronistic in that it is not seen in contemporary context. There is no workable growth plan.
Bonus question: If LRT goes ahead, what will you do to ensure Hamilton receives the maximum benefit? No Money would ne better spent on other infrastructure projects.