Elections

Paul Miller, Candidate for Hamilton East-Stoney Creek in Ontario Provincial Election 2014

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Candidate Details (top)

NamePaul Miller
ElectionOntario Provincial Election 2014
AreaHamilton East-Stoney Creek
PartyOntario New Democratic Party
Votes0
Email PaulMiller@ontariondp.ca
Website http://www.re-electpaulmiller.ca/
Home
Business905-549-5656
Fax
BioMeet Paul Miller
Longtime community leader and labour rights advocate
MPP since 2007 who has taken the lead on pensions, economic development, and the WSIB
Represented the United Steelworkers in Ottawa, fighting for fairer working conditions
Served as a Stoney Creek City Councillor for six years and was Chair of Parks and Recreation
Paul Miller is a longtime community leader and labour rights advocate.

Born in Hamilton and raised in Stoney Creek, he worked for 32 years at Hamilton Steel (formerly Stelco), where his family’s total service exceeds 300 years, as an industrial mechanic, welder, and fitter. As a labour leader with the United Steelworkers, Paul represented the union in Ottawa, working on nine federal campaigns across the country and pushing to change Canadian labour laws to protect pensions and workers’ rights.

Locally, Paul served as a Stoney Creek City Councillor for 6 years. During his first term, he was active with the Hamilton and Wentworth County Public School Board and the Community Liaison Committee for the Taro Landfill and Hamilton Region Conservation Authority. During his second term, he was Chairman of Parks and Recreation and was active with city committees dealing with firefighting, licensing, engineering, and planning.

Paul is active in local sports as both a participant and an official. He has played men’s hockey and baseball and refereed OMHA hockey, umpired slow-pitch softball, and coached Little League baseball.

An experienced community leader with a proven track record of serving the public and getting results, you can count on Paul Miller to continue to provide leadership that delivers.

Paul is married to local teacher Carole Paikin-Miller who is also a freelance journalist and children’s book author. Together they have three daughters: one a graphic designer, one a programmer of social activities for seniors, and one a registered nurse.

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Responses to Questions (top)

QuestionBrief ResponseFull Response
Do you support allowing Ontario residents to appeal to the Ontario Ombudsman with respect to municipalities, universities, school boards, hospitals, nursing homes and long-term care facilities, police and children's aid societies (the MUSH sector)? Yes The Ontario NDP has called for the oversight of ombudsman’s office to be expanded to include municipalities, universities, school board and hospital. We have pressured the Liberal government for years to allow the ombudsman’s office to serve as a patient ombudsman, but they have refused to take action.
Do you accept the evidence of human-caused global warming? If so, what policy measures do you support to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? If not, why not? Yes Yes. The Ontario NDP accepts and supports the consensus in the scientific community regarding human-caused global warming. We know that serious action is needed to tackle climate change now. Failure to act will jeopardize our well-being and the future of the generations that follow us. That's why the Ontario NDP has pushed the Liberal government to join Quebec in putting a price on carbon emissions via a cap-and-trade system. This would help Ontario reach its reduction target. Legislators have the power and responsibility to lead efforts to combat climate change.

A NDP government would legislate a cap-and-trade program for Ontario and improve Ontario's greenhouse gas emission target by five per cent, reducing emissions to 20 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020. We would re-affirm Ontario's commitment to bringing emissions to 80 per cent below 1990 levels by 2050.

Unfortunately, the Liberals have failed to take climate change seriously. Kathleen Wynne's plan will only take Ontario about half way to meeting the 2020 targets that the Liberals themselves set. Ontario's Environmental Commissioner recently concluded that "in the absence of a renewed effort, the [Liberal] government is failing our future." This province needs decisive action to tackle climate change, not more broken promises from the Liberals.
Do you support maintaining or expanding the protection of farmland and rural natural land from urban boundary expansions? Yes The Ontario NDP is committed to preserving Ontario's farmland for future generations. The loss of Ontario's most productive agricultural land is one of the greatest threats to local food and farming in Ontario. However, this issue cannot be resolved by simply making more regulations at the provincial level. It needs to be solved through consultation with stakeholders across the province. We will work with all stakeholders involved to develop a farmland preservation plan.
Should the province play a role in encouraging safer streets that promote more active transportation like walking and cycling? Yes The Ontario NDP believes that the province has a responsibility to help make roads safer for all Ontarians. We have committed $5 million to expand cycling infrastructure networks and support complete street design.
The Ontario School Funding Formula currently incentivizes local school boards to neglect and close neighbourhood schools. Do you support keeping neighbourhood schools open? If so, how? Yes The Ontario NDP knows that public education is that key to Ontario's future. We also understand that schools are at the heart of our communities. We've seen too many communities torn apart by school closures. Hundreds of schools have been on the chopping block under the Liberals - and nothing is stopping hundreds more from closing.

The Ontario NDP is committing $60 million a year, starting in 2016, to an Open Schools fund. These funds will be made available to help keep schools threatened with closure open, to make essential school renovations, and to repurpose under-utilized space for other usage by the community. Schools will also be able to apply to this fund to increase free and low-fee access for non-profit groups use school space during evenings and weekends.
Do you support regional GO transit expansion, including all-day two-way GO train service to Hamilton? Yes The Ontario NDP supports regional GO transit expansion, including all day, two-way GO train service to Hamilton, Kitchener-Waterloo, and Niagara Falls. We have allocated an additional $250 million to prioritize these essential transit projects.
Do you support Hamilton's plan to build an east-west light rail transit line with full provincial capital funding? If so, how will you ensure the project is funded? Yes The Ontario NDP has been behind the Hamilton LRT since day one and we remain committed to this essential investment for the people of Hamilton. Our plan includes full provincial funding for an LRT line from McMaster University to Eastgate Square. We will fund this plan by committing $29 billion over 10 years for transit and transportation projects in the province's existing fiscal framework. This funding is guaranteed through the allocation of 7.5 cents of the Gas Tax to a dedicated fund amongst other measures. In addition ee will further increase this funding amount by $250 million annually to kick-start priority projects, which will be funded out of general revenue.
Do you support the proposal to build a new mid-Peninsula highway? Maybe There certainly are cases where highway expansion is necessary but government needs to take the most cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach to new highway projects with community participation - something we believe the Liberal government has failed to do. Historically, we have raised concern about planned highway expansions that threaten the Greenbelt, such as the Bradford by-pass, the GTA West highway to Guelph, and the Mid-Peninsula highway. We will continue to raise those concerns in the future.

The Ontario NDP's first priority for reducing congestion is to make transit accessible and a better option for Ontarians. We also believe we can make much more efficient use of highways - for example, by speeding up the implementation of high-occupancy vehicle lanes.